Hong Kong is a signatory to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) since 1994 and the Government established the Commission on Children in mid-2018. The four main pillars of UNCRC are non-discrimination; devotion to the best interests of the child; the right to life, survival and development; and respect for the views of the child.

 

In accordance to the Concluding Observations by Committee on the Rights of the Child in 2013, there is a lack of general legislation providing for the best interests of the child in Hong Kong. Also, Hong Kong has to further implement programmes to combat discrimination against children with disabilities, undocumented children of migrant workers, and refugee and asylum-seeking children, and to ensure that all children have equal access to basic services, including health, education and other social service.

 

Currently, Hong Kong does not have its own Children’s Bill nor a consolidated legal definition of "child abuse". That said, the Social Welfare Department has revised its Procedural Guide for Handling Child Abuse Cases and produced leaflets for Multi-disciplinary Case Conference on Protection of Child with Suspected Abuse in 2018. In terms of special education, Hong Kong currently provides special education services to children with special education needs (SEN). It is recommended that Hong Kong should identify and remove all barriers that prevent students with disabilities from entering and staying in the mainstream system and reallocate resources from the special education system to promote inclusive education in mainstream schools.

 

2019

Applying the Right to Family in the Immigration Context of Hong Kong (Blog Post) - by Karen Kong    NEW!

International Association of Constitutional Law Blog, 19 June 2019

2018

Submission to the Legislative Council’s Subcommittee on Children’s Rights, 22 January 2018

The numerous tragedies afflicting children in Hong Kong where abuse towards them has resulted in their death, serious harms and injuries and life-long psychological impairment have also called attention to our broken system where law, policies, frontline responders and the social welfare system in general failed our children. Against this backdrop, Puja Kapai submitted to the Legislative Council’s Subcommittee on Children’s Rights on “Rights of children affected by domestic violence”.  The full paper is available for download below.

2015

A Comparative Study on Children’s Rights Education: Implications for Policy Reform in Hong Kong, June 2015

As a signatory to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC), Hong Kong’s obligation under Article 42 “to make the principles and provisions of the Convention widely known by appropriate and active means, to adults and children alike” should have directly influenced both education policy and training and practice of educators. However, to date, Children’s Rights Education (CRE) is seldom incorporated as an element of teacher training, is not a significant part of the school curriculum and is not entirely part of the school ethos across most Hong Kong schools and educational institutions.

2014

Executive Summary: Children’s Rights Education: International Legal Framework and State Party Obligations, September 2014

2011

Submission to the Government: Education of Ethnic Minority Children, December 2011

 

PUBLICATIONS & SUBMISSIONS

 

PROJECTS

A Comparative Study on Children’s Rights Education: Implications for Policy Reform in Hong Kong

As a signatory to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC), Hong Kong’s obligation under Article 42 “to make the principles and provisions of the Convention widely known by appropriate and active means, to adults and children alike” should have directly influenced both education policy and training and practice of educators. However, to date, Children’s Rights Education (CRE) is seldom incorporated as an element of teacher training, is not a significant part of the school curriculum and is not entirely part of the school ethos across most Hong Kong schools and educational institutions.

 

In the only comprehensive study of its kind in Hong Kong, a multidisciplinary team of scholars from the University of Hong Kong examined the extent to which the HKSAR Government has met its Article 42 obligations. In particular, the study explored the current state of CRE implementation in Hong Kong schools and compared the pedagogy, policy and practices in Hong Kong against international best practices identified through an extensive literature review and qualitative surveys. Drawing on the findings, the research team proposed recommendations for structural and substantive improvements to Hong Kong’s policies in relation to fulfilling its Article 42 obligations pertaining to CRE under the UNCRC.

 
 

FACULTY EXPERTISE

 

KELLEY LOPER

PUJA KAPAI

This project is supported by the HKU Knowledge Exchange Fund granted by the University Grants Committee.